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Getting (Theological) German: ReLaunch

In order to make my original Getting (Theological) German site fit better with the rest of my theological languages sites, I decided to relaunch it. Also, I didn't want to keep paying for a url, so, I figured that having all the urls similar would also be a good thing. Therefore, in addition to Getting Greek, Getting Aramaic and Getting (Theological) French (just launched yesterday!), Getting (Theological) German is now up and running on a new site. Click HERE to see it. Spread the word. Also, be on the lookout for Getting Hebrew, which is in development! Grace and peace. -Michael Halcomb
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New Website: Getting (Theological) French

Today, I'm proud to announce the launch of my latest theological language site: Getting French. With only a day left before I head to Africa, I wanted to launch it before I took off because I did not know when / how often I'd have internet access abroad. Anyway, like my other language sites (Getting Greek, Getting Aramaic, Getting German), this one is easy-to-navigate, is (soon to be) loaded with FREE resources to help you learn (Theological) French & will, as frequently as possible, be updated. If you find the site helpful, want to assist in developing it and/or want to leave a comment, please, contact Michael via the following link: Contact. If the site has benefited you, feel free to donate. All donations will go towards creating new modules. The "Getting French" name and trademark (logo) are the property of T. Michael W. Halcomb and may not be used without his consent.

By the way, I just got word a couple of days ago from my host provider that GettingGerman.com needs renewed. If someone would be willing to donate the $8 to keep that site going for another year, please, go HERE. If not, the site will go down for a while as I will not have time to maintain it while in Africa for the next month.
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Getting (Theological) French, Pt. 10: Academic Words

Here is a 1-page study resource that contains 85 French academic words, designed to help those studying (Theological) French. As usual, this is another FREE resources!!! Anyway, check it out and when you're done, if you haven't already, look at the 9 parts of my "Getting Theological French" notes in the table below. Also, keep your eyes peeled for the launch of the "Getting (Theological) French" website!





+ Link: "Getting (Theological) French, Pt. 1"
+ Link: "Getting (Theological) French, Pt. 3"
+ Link: "Getting (Theological) French, Pt. 5"
+ Link: "Getting (Theological) French, Pt. 7"
+ Link: "Getting (Theological) French, Pt. 9"
+ Link: "Getting (Theological) French, Pt. 2"
+ Link: "Getting (Theological) French, Pt. 4"
+ Link: "Getting (Theological) French, Pt. 6"
+ Link: "Getting (Theological) French, Pt. 8"
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Getting (Theological) French, Pt. 9: Slang / Colloquialisms

Here is a 1 and 1/2 page guide to 85 French slang / colloquialisms, for those studying (Theological) French. While some of these may not appear in scholarly articles, some may. So, take the time to work w/these terms / phrases. As usual, this is another FREE resources!!! Anyway, check it out and when you're done, if you haven't already, look at the 8 parts of my "Getting Theological French" notes in the table below. Also, keep your eyes peeled for the launch of the "Getting (Theological) French" website!




+ Link: "Getting (Theological) French, Pt. 1"
+ Link: "Getting (Theological) French, Pt. 3"
+ Link: "Getting (Theological) French, Pt. 5"
+ Link: "Getting (Theological) French, Pt. 7"
+ Link: "Getting (Theological) French, Pt. 2"
+ Link: "Getting (Theological) French, Pt. 4"
+ Link: "Getting (Theological) French, Pt. 6"
+ Link: "Getting (Theological) French, Pt. 8"
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Getting (Theological) French, Pt. 8: Numbers


Here is a 1-page guide to numbers, for those studying (Theological) French. As usual, this is another FREE resources!!! Anyway, check it out and when you're done, if you haven't already, look at the 7 parts of my "Getting Theological French" notes in the table below. Also, keep your eyes peeled for the launch of the "Getting (Theological) French" website!




+ Link: "Getting (Theological) French, Pt. 1"
+ Link: "Getting (Theological) French, Pt. 3"
+ Link: "Getting (Theological) French, Pt. 5"
+ Link: "Getting (Theological) French, Pt. 7"
+ Link: "Getting (Theological) French, Pt. 2"
+ Link: "Getting (Theological) French, Pt. 4"
+ Link: "Getting (Theological) French, Pt. 6"
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Another Reason I Love Asbury Theological Seminary

Here's a compilation (a little dated but still funny) of some Asbury Theological Seminary profs, that I think you'll enjoy:

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A Sermon on Mark's Gospel








Here's a sermon I delivered recently. It covers the beginning of Jesus' movements in Mk among other things. Check it out. (Note: It may take a moment to load.)
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10 Days Til Ethiopia

Several people have sent me messages wondering how they might get the word out about my upcoming trip to Ethiopia. So, I thought I'd just make another post that people could link to.

If you're interested in the trip, basically what I'll be doing is teaching ministers and lay leaders at an accredited theological college / seminary for 1 month, teaching believers and lay persons at a local church for 1 week, and working with HIV victims, especially children, serving in some of the poorest areas of the world and supporting some of the local missionaries there. I expect the trip to be emotionally draining but spiritual edifying. I know great things are in store even though I am a bit nervous to be away from my wife and kids for that amount of time. Anyway, if you want to know more, you can contact me via the form below. If you want to give, you can click the donate button below too. Thanks so much.

-Michael










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Getting (Theological) French, Pt. 7: French Notes

Here is a great 14-page guide and summary for those studying (Theological) French, especially those using Janet Ritch's, Reading French: A Guide for Students of Religion and Theology. Put together by one of my classmates and friends, Sue Lubinksas, this aid covers many of the basics needed to get a grasp on French. Again, this is another FREE resources!!! Anyway, check it out and when you're done, if you haven't already, look at the 6 parts of my "Getting Theological French" notes in the table below. Also, keep your eyes peeled for the launch of the "Getting (Theological) French" website!




+ Link: "Getting (Theological) French, Pt. 1"
+ Link: "Getting (Theological) French, Pt. 3"
+ Link: "Getting (Theological) French, Pt. 5"
+ Link: "Getting (Theological) French, Pt. 2"
+ Link: "Getting (Theological) French, Pt. 4"
+ Link: "Getting (Theological) French, Pt. 6"
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Getting (Theological) French, Pt. 6: French Summary

Here is a great little 4-page summary for those studying (Theological) French. Put together by one of my classmates and friends, Ryan Juza, this aid covers verbs, verb endings, compound verbs, conjunctions, interrogatives, pronouns, prepositions, relative clause formation, uses of Que, irregular verbs and impersonals. The best part (other than the fact that its yours free!!!): It's all done within 4 pages!!! Anyway, check it out and when you're done, if you haven't already, look at the 5 parts of my "Getting Theological French" notes in the table below. Also, keep your eyes peeled for the launch of the "Getting (Theological) French" website!




+ Link: "Getting (Theological) French, Pt. 1"
+ Link: "Getting (Theological) French, Pt. 3"
+ Link: "Getting (Theological) French, Pt. 5"
+ Link: "Getting (Theological) French, Pt. 2"
+ Link: "Getting (Theological) French, Pt. 4"
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If You're Ever In Ethiopia...Check Out Ethiopia Guest Home

One of the greatest poets to ever grace the face of this earth, Maya Angelou, once said, "I long, as does every human being, to be at home wherever I find myself." Last November / December when my family traveled to Ethiopia, we were nearly 9,000 miles from home but we felt safe, sound and welcomed by the Ethiopia Guest Home. Our hosts, drivers, translators, housemates...they were all great! The motto of the Ethiopia Guest Home is "More Than A Place To Stay." This is so true! At the Ethiopia Guest Home you have opportunities to make friends and build relationships in a way that you would not be able to at any old hotel.

Also, they amenities are fantastic, the food is catered to Americans and the service is top-notch. As I prepare to travel in a few weeks, I look forward to going back to the Ethiopia Guest Home (at 3 locations) because I know that I will be cared for. If you're ever in Ethiopia, if you plan to take a mission trip, if you plan to go and visit, if you're going for adoption purposes or any other reason and you need a place to stay, contact the Ethiopia Guest Home and make your reservations.

One last thing, I know the owner of the Ethiopia Guest Home and I know personally just how big of a heart he has for the people of Ethiopia, as well as adoptive families. He has endured many, many struggles by keeping the Guest Home open and he has a dream to create 100 jobs for Ethiopians within the next year. The great thing about the Ethiopia Guest Home is that it sees itself as a mission and even more, as a place to be kingdom-servants that loves justice and seeks mercy. Please, if you have plans for Addis, contact the Ethiopia Guest Home and get booked. If you want, you can even tell them "Michael Halcomb told me!"

To check out the Ethiopia Guest Home website, click HERE.
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Christ My Redeemer (New Blog / Site)

It's been a while since I've utilized this feature of Pisteuomen, but I'm proud to resurrect it and bring it back to life, the feature is: A Beginning Blogger. I started this feature for the following reasons (here's what I wrote in the initial piece about it): "...I realize how tough it is to get people to visit your site, comment, add you to their blogroll, etc. Now, I've done a lot to make my blog both resource and user-friendly and I believe that's contributed to its success but it might have also helped if some more well-known persons helped draw attention to Pisteuomen. Well, with the conviction that the biblio-blogosphere is not about constantly catering to the egos of a select few or having to be around for years in order to make it (among other things, like creating a resourceful, edifying online community), I thought I'd add this feature."

The Beginning Blogger that I'd like to mention today is Daniel J. Levy. Daniel maintains the blog "Christ My Redeemer." Here's his impetus for blogging: " My sole purpose for this blog is to help people gain a more intellectual and spiritual depth to their relationship with Christ."

Daniel, who looks like a rocker from an 80's hair band, says of himself: "My name is Daniel James Levy and Christ is my redeemer. Beyond the knowledge of this, any accomplishment I've done would be said fitly in the words of St. Paul "I count everything as loss because of the surpassing worth of knowing Christ Jesus my Lord." Because of my desire to know Christ with all of my faculties (heart, mind, soul, and strength) I embarked three years ago on an adventure of studying theology, philosophy, science, history, and the Christian mystics. Through the study of these disciplines and the Holy Spirit I have fallen deeper in love with Christ. To add, I'm a youth pastor at Grace Church Assemblies of God and a theology major at Southeastern University." In terms of blogging, so far, Daniel has written several posts on NT Wright, The Kingdom of God and some book reviews. Be sure to give his blog a look and leave him a word of encouragement!
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Church To Rebuild Burned Jesus Statue


That's the news from Solid Rock Church out of Monroe, OH. Yep, that's right, they plan to rebuild the statue and fork over the $700,000+ to do it. What a shame! As one who will be heading to Ethiopia in 2 weeks and am struggling to raise $2,000 to go teach pastors and students and to serve orphans, this is a travesty! Shame on this hedonistic and fatalistic theology that the church is espousing. One of the ministers at Solid Rock, Pastor Hooks commented on the statue saying, "We don’t know the mind of God, but I say God’s hand is in everything and everything happens for a reason...The first Jesus was resurrected in three days. It's going to take us a little longer than three days but he (the statue) will be back. He's like the Terminator. He's coming back." After church leaders vowed Tuesday to rebuild, one pastor, Darlene Bishop said, "It’s such a monument. It’s like people know Monroe by the statue of Jesus. It’s important that we rebuild." A non-pastor, Paul Wright, 21 of Oxford, OH, remarked, "I think it’s a sign of the end of the world,” said Paul Wright, 21, of Oxford. If lightning is going to strike God, then there’s no hope."

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Big Butter Jesus Defeated By Lightning

That's right...Big Butter Jesus has been sunk! Face first into the lake he was hovering above went the ginormous statue when it was hit with lightning. Perhaps he was tired of being mocked or maybe he was out to tell Solid Rock Church to quit being sooooo crazy! Either way, the butter statue that looked like he was signaling "touchdown" has bit the dust. James McGrath has a list of bloggers who've been talking about it. I've written a couple of posts about this statute (HERE and HERE) but check out their comments on the statue's demise HERE. And a link courtesy of my father-in-law, here's a video of it:


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Wordpress Sucks!!!


And this is the proof!!! And this is only one of many reasons I REFUSE to use it!!! Tons of blogs went down today...too bad for you Wordpress folks. Come on over to Blogger...you'll get much better service! Didn't this happen back in February, by the way? It seems like you all would get fed up. Anyway...
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Exploring Pacifism, Pt. 2

As I begin to explore the issue of pacifism in greater depth, I do hope that you, my readers and discussion partners, will show civility and patience. As we are all aware, this is a very touchy subject for some and oftentimes when this issue is addressed in the public forum, emotions can override common sense and zeal can overtake civility and thoughtfulness. Remember, this is an "exploration" of pacifism and as such, I do not believe I already have all the answers. Just as well, I choose the term "exploration," because this is a viewpoint I hold but which I want to see if I can substantiate further, especially, as I said in Pt. 1, from social, economic, historical, theological, philosophical, exegetical and other vantage points. In addition, I would say that regardless of your viewpoint on this matter already, I think that pacifists and non-pacifists alike should admit that within their belief systems there are tensions; neither belief system is without its debatable points! This being the case, however, does not mean that both are equal or that it is not a matter worth discussing.

It might seem beneficial to begin by defining pacifism, however, this is a definition I'm still working out and until I have a clear-cut definition, I do not want to offer a definition. I should be able to give a definition soon, however. So, here, I want to start by exploring the topic of violence. It seems to me that at the core of violence is the belief that if one can physically manipulate an other, then they will not be subject to that other's will. Thus, when we get into macro-level, large-scale issues like war, we see this viewpoint intensified; one country physically manipulates another so as to make them the subjects of their will. Typically, the manipulated subject will strike back with violence, even if in defense, so as to make their manipulator their subject. Ironically, though, when the defender strikes back, they must use more violence than their attacker! Thence begins the escalatory cycle of violence on an international level. The result of this massive amount of violence is basically, whoever has does the most damage or kills the most first or until the other one gives up, wins.

The adoption of violence as an ethic, is very troubling to me personally. On a macro-level, the results are beyond devastating! At this juncture, the average person would make the jump from the macro-cosmic view and ask, "But what if someone was breaking into your home and attempting to hurt your spouse or children, would you not do all you needed to, even use violence, to stop the intruder?" To such an inquiry I would suggest that it is fallacious to compare the macro-level example to the micro-level one. For starters, in the macro-level example, the first attacker is initiating violence with the view to doing so on a massive level. This is not the intent of an intruder. Secondly, on the macro-level, the attacking nation is launching their assault with the hopes of making their enemy their subject forever. An intruder into a home does not generally have the mentality that he or she will make the victim their subject forever.

Thirdly, I think it is a misnomer to suggest that the massive level of killing on the international level is the equivalent to that of the mirco-level. Fourthly, destroying cities, ruining economies, destabilizing countries and killing on a large scale level, is not all that comparable to a house being broken into or an individual being harmed. Fifthly, it would seem to me that there is a difference between the use of temporary force and lethal force. Breaking an intruder's leg or using force to tie him up until the authorities arrive is not even comparable to dropping bombs on a nation, especially when hundreds of thousands of civilians who are totally removed from the situation may be harmed. For all these reasons and more, the jump cannot just be made from the macro-level example to the micro-level one!

I think this is a very important point to make at the outset because in general, this is the first response by the non-pacifist to the pacifist. However, the logical and comparative leap just cannot be made so easily. Further, in the micro-level example it is always assumed that no sort of agreement can be worked out between intruder / attacker and victim. However, there are many examples which would suggest otherwise. Off the top of my head, I think of police negotiating with someone who has taken people hostage or of several examples where someone spoke a conscience-convicting word to the attacker and the attacker just stopped. The point I am making is that violence and responses to violence are circumstantial and given the many and varying types of violence (physical, emotional, educational, spiritual, economic, political, etc.), it is problematic to just leap from one example to the next as if they were equally comparable.

Having made the above points, I feel like I am in a position to begin to talk about power, especially as it exists in relationship to violence. In my next post, then, it is likely that I will address this matter. I look forward to hearing thoughts from others and exploring the depths of these matters with you all. For now, feel free to respond to the thoughts above (in a civil manner). Grace and peace. -TMWH


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George Fox Seminary To Offer Arm Wrestling Degree


Well, at least that's the impression I got when I saw their facebook ad, which looked like a couple of guys arm wrestling. Boy, Sylvester Stallone would've been a champ in this school! OVER THE TOP!!!
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Getting (Theological) French, Pt. 5

In the 5th installation of my Getting (Theological) French notes, I offer 63 very common expressions of time. For readings of biblical-theological history and scripture, having a grasp on expressions of time is crucial. So, spend some time and add these 63 expressions to your repertoire. Once you're done, check out the other installations of these notes in the table at the foot of this post. Enjoy!




+ Link: "Getting (Theological) French, Pt. 1"
+ Link: "Getting (Theological) French, Pt. 3"
+ Link: "Getting (Theological) French, Pt. 2"
+ Link: "Getting (Theological) French, Pt. 4"
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Jesus Manifesto



A week or so ago, I received an invitation from Thomas Nelson publishers to get a pre-sale copy of Frank Viola & Leonard Sweet's new book Jesus Manifesto. Not being one to pass up free books, I gladly took the offer. This new book went on sale today over at Amazon.com. Here at Pisteuomen and over at Thomas Nelson, you can preview some of Jesus Manifesto by using the widget above. Here's a brief description of what you'll find in Jesus Manifesto:

"Christians have made the gospel about so many things—things other than Christ. Religious concepts, ideas, doctrines, strategies, methods, techniques, programs, and formulas have all eclipsed the beauty, the glory, and the reality of the Lord Jesus Himself. On the whole, the Christian family today is starved for a real experience of the living Christ. We know a lot about our Lord, but we don't know Him very well. We know a lot about trying to be like Jesus, but very little about living by His indwelling life. "Jesus Manifesto" presents a fresh unveiling of Jesus as not only Savior and Lord, but as so much more. It is a prophetic call to restore the supremacy and sovereignty of Christ in a world—and a church—that has lost sight of Him. Read this book and see your Lord like you've never seen Him before.

When/if I get some more time to read through the book (it looks like a very easy read and is pretty thin), I'll probably post a bit about it. In the meantime, go get your copy HERE. And if you want, download the Jesus Manifesto app HERE. Or, you can join the Jesus Manifesto Facebook movement HERE. Not enough? Download the Jesus Manifesto theme song HERE.
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Exploring Pacifism, Pt. 1

Pisteuomen has always been a biblical studies blog and it shall always remain one. Lately, there has been a lot of focus on biblical studies languages and of course, there is no plan to change that. I have also focused on theological issues such as prayer, adoption and numerous other things. One issue that I have been thinking about for a long time, a matter that I really want to flesh out, is that of pacifism. For me, at this point in time, my bent towards pacifism comes from following and adhering to the ethic of none other than Jesus Christ himself. However, I want to explore more whether or not a theology / philosophy of pacifism can be sustained, especially by scriptural exegesis. So, I'm starting a new series called "Exploring Pacifism." In this series I hope to explore the psychological, ideological, theological, social, exegetical, historical and practical aspects of pacifism. I hope you will enjoy this new series and I hope that we can all be gracious and civil with one another as we explore this "hot topic" together.